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Mercedes-Benz: Implementing a CRM Programme

Posted by on Oct 29, 2015 in logistics info | 0 comments

My next case study It has little to do with logistics but CRM playing a very big part in supply chain managment.

Abstract

Mercedes-Benz is one of the world’s most successful premium brands. Its technical perfection, innovative design features and numerous car legends have made the Mercedes star one the world’s best known trademarks today.Historically, Mercedes-Benz was sold in the UK through a franchised network of some 138 dealerships. Each of these was autonomous, with the exception of three dealerships owned by the distributor DaimlerChrysler UK (DCUK). DaimlerChrysler had relatively little control over relationships between dealers and customers. Dealers managed their own relationships including customer research, data base management, acquisition and
retention processes. In the late 1990s,research suggested that some Mercedes-Benz customers were less than happy with the service they received. Although the technical quality of the product was highly regarded, customers complained that the service that they received was not of the same high standard. This translated into declining customer satisfaction and increased defection. DCUK recognised that the entire chain of relationships between manufacturer, dealers and customers needed a new approach.

Here you will find the artical as a PDF my analysis in power point

I hope you will enjoy it.

Because we love logistics

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Dunkin’ Donuts – the birth of a new distribution and franchising concept

Posted by on Oct 28, 2015 in logistics info | 0 comments

My first post about logistics is a case study a little bit old, but it was the first case study that i worked on when i was in my first year at my university.

Case study author: Ruth A. Schmidt and Brenda M. Oldfield

Abstract

Dunkin’ Donuts is a global retailer of coffee and bakery products. The company is 99 per cent franchised and has used the franchising system as a route to market entry
and expansion worldwide. The original historic roots of the company are in the USA and despite wide international expansion since the 1970s, the US market continues to serve as a testing ground for innovations prior to international roll-out. Based on observation and key informantinterviews with core members of the management team during a visit to Richmond Project in 1994, the case explores the initial phase of the introduction of a central production facility as an innovative route to preeminence in one test market. Strategic and operational issues are discussed, highlighting the differences and efficiency gains of the central production facility cum satellite store approach compared
to the traditional stand-alone on-site production approach. Implications for future developments are discussed.

Here you can find the artical as a PDF and my analysis in  power point.

Special thanks to my colleauge Petros Anastasiadis.

I hope you will enjoy it.

Because we love logistics

Read More